Behold, directly overhead, a certain strange star was suddenly seen...
Amazed, and as if astonished and stupefied, I stood still.

— Tycho Brahe

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Updated: 4 hours 35 min ago

How do you travel abroad safely during the covid-19 pandemic?

Fri, 06/04/2021 - 12:02pm
As countries start to open their borders to holiday-makers, confusion remains over which countries are safe, and what entrance requirements are necessary. If you plan to travel soon, here's what you should know
Categories: Astronomy

Long covid has lasted over a year for 376,000 people in the UK

Fri, 06/04/2021 - 11:34am
An estimated 1 million people reported experiencing long covid in the latest UK statistics, and 376,000 of them suspect they first caught the coronavirus at least a year ago
Categories: Astronomy

UK approves Pfizer/BioNTech covid-19 vaccine in children aged 12 to 15

Fri, 06/04/2021 - 9:20am
The UK medicines regulator has approved the Pfizer/BioNTech coronavirus vaccine for use in children aged 12 to 15, but the independent vaccination committee has not yet decided whether to extend the roll-out
Categories: Astronomy

Many people with covid-19 have neurological or psychiatric symptoms

Thu, 06/03/2021 - 9:00pm
Neurological and psychiatric symptoms such as fatigue and depression are common among people with covid-19 and may be just as likely in people with mild cases
Categories: Astronomy

Some Arctic sea ice is thinning twice as fast as previously thought

Thu, 06/03/2021 - 8:01pm
Some regions of Arctic sea ice are thinning up to twice as fast as previously thought, researchers conclude after getting a better handle on the thickness of snow on the ice
Categories: Astronomy

Global plan aims to make vaccines for future pandemics within 100 days

Thu, 06/03/2021 - 8:01pm
Governments and life science industry leaders have pledged to work towards a plan that could see vaccines ready in just 100 days in the event of a new pandemic.
Categories: Astronomy

Sharks were almost wiped out in an extinction 19 million years ago

Thu, 06/03/2021 - 3:00pm
Sharks living in the open ocean experienced a previously unknown mass extinction event about 19 million years ago that wiped out nearly 90 per cent of the predators
Categories: Astronomy

Covid-19 news: Coronavirus cases hit six-week high in England

Thu, 06/03/2021 - 1:38pm
The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic
Categories: Astronomy

Right whales born in 1981 grew a metre longer than they do today

Thu, 06/03/2021 - 12:00pm
Surveillance of right whales in the North Atlantic show that individuals born today will grow to be a metre shorter, on average, than whales born in the early 1980s
Categories: Astronomy

Puppies are born with the genetic ability to understand humans

Thu, 06/03/2021 - 12:00pm
Domestication has selected dogs with genetic traits that equip puppies with the social skills to interact with humans, even at a very young age
Categories: Astronomy

Carlo Rovelli’s rebellious past and how it made him a better scientist

Thu, 06/03/2021 - 11:00am
Physicist Carlo Rovelli has made pioneering contributions to the science of quantum theory and consciousness. Our exclusive short film "The Meaning of Meaning" reveals the man behind the ideas
Categories: Astronomy

YouTube 'echo chambers' may increase covid-19 vaccine hesitancy

Thu, 06/03/2021 - 10:53am
People who obtain information from social media sites such as YouTube are less willing to be vaccinated than others, findings from a UK study show
Categories: Astronomy

Underwater glue made from silk can cling to surfaces like a barnacle

Thu, 06/03/2021 - 4:15am
A non-toxic underwater glue that is inspired by barnacles and made from silk is stronger than most synthetic adhesives
Categories: Astronomy

University students with morning lectures tend to have lower grades

Thu, 06/03/2021 - 4:00am
University students tend to get lower grades if their classes and lectures begin early in the morning, because they struggle to wake up early enough to attend them
Categories: Astronomy

NASA is sending two missions to Venus for the first time in decades

Wed, 06/02/2021 - 6:54pm
NASA has selected two missions to Venus, called DAVINCI+ and VERITAS, to launch between 2028 and 2030, marking the agency’s first return to our sweltering neighbour since 1989
Categories: Astronomy

People who are blind navigate better after echolocation training

Wed, 06/02/2021 - 3:00pm
After a 10-week training programme, blind and sighted people learned to complete various practical and navigation tasks with the help of echolocation
Categories: Astronomy

How to make ice cream with no freezer, just ice and salt

Wed, 06/02/2021 - 2:00pm
Fancy making ice cream this summer? The secret to soft, creamy and delicious scoopfuls of the stuff lies in the complex science of freezing, says Sam Wong
Categories: Astronomy

The best logistics games that make supply chains fun (no, really)

Wed, 06/02/2021 - 2:00pm
Playing The Colonists and other supply chain and factory simulation games is surprisingly entertaining, says Jacob Aron
Categories: Astronomy

Andrea Ghez interview: How I proved supermassive black holes are real

Wed, 06/02/2021 - 2:00pm
Twenty years ago, Andrea Ghez set out to show there is a black hole at the centre of our galaxy by watching stars orbit it. She won a Nobel prize for the work and reveals how surreal it's been
Categories: Astronomy

World's smallest cephalopod gets set to fertilise her own eggs

Wed, 06/02/2021 - 2:00pm
This dramatic image shows the world's smallest cephalopod, a female northern pygmy squid the size of a human thumbnail. It's about to fertilise its eggs using sperm from a packet attached to its body by a male
Categories: Astronomy