Who are we? We find that we live on an insignificant planet of a humdrum star lost in a galaxy tucked away in some forgotten corner of a universe in which there are far more galaxies than people

— Carl Sagan

Cygnus

Crescent in Cygnus (also known as NGC 6888, Caldwell 27, Sharpless 105)

The crescent nebula in Cygnus. Taken over two nights, first in H-Alpha light, then in filtered Red Green and Blue light. Total exposure 1.5 hours for the hydrogen alpha light and 15 minutes for each color.

The color light was taken last night, the H alpha a week prior. Both shot through a 5" f7 refractor from Verona on a crescent and subsequent first quarter moon nights. 

Crescent in Cygnus (also known as NGC 6888, Caldwell 27, Sharpless 105)

nebulosity near Sadr (Cygnus)

Two hour h-alpha image of nebulosity near Sadr, the central star in Cygnus TOA-130 at F/7 and SXVH9 camera.

nebulosity near Sadr (Cygnus)

Supernova remanent in Cygnus

Central section of the veil nebula. One hour exposure.
The Veil  is a supernova remanent. It exploded some fifty thousand years ago. The filaments are a shock wave that is expanding in a dusty region, clearing it as it goes. Notice that many faint stars are visible at the bottom where the dust has been cleared than at the top.

Supernova remanent in Cygnus

North america nebula

The mexican section of the North America Nebula. Taken last night through somewhat hazy skies. One hour exposure (six exposures of ten minutes each.) Cygnus, where the nebula is located, was getting low in the West..... summer is over and fall is here.

North america nebula