I can calculate the motions of the heavenly bodies, but not the madness of people

— Sir Isaac Newton

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Updated: 6 hours 6 min ago

Covid-19 news: UK approves Pfizer and AstraZeneca booster shots

Fri, 09/10/2021 - 7:20am
The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic
Categories: Astronomy

Almost no one encrypts their emails because it is too much of a hassle

Fri, 09/10/2021 - 4:00am
A study looking at the use of encryption to keep the contents of an email private has found that the technology is rarely used, despite being available for decades
Categories: Astronomy

AI can detect a deepfake face because its pupils have jagged edges

Fri, 09/10/2021 - 4:00am
The pupils of faces in computer-generated deepfake videos or images have more jagged edges and are less symmetrical than those in real human eyes
Categories: Astronomy

A glimpse at Greenland's deep-sea ecosystems threatened by fishing

Thu, 09/09/2021 - 5:06pm
Halibut fishing off the coast of Greenland uses heavy equipment dragged along the sea floor, which can cause irreversible harm to slow-growing anemones and coral
Categories: Astronomy

Tooth decay has been a problem for primates for 54 million years

Thu, 09/09/2021 - 12:00pm
Microsyops latidens, a prehistoric primate that lived about 54 million years ago, had dental cavities – perhaps because it had a taste for fruit and other sugar-rich food
Categories: Astronomy

Black holes just got much more complicated thanks to quantum pressure

Thu, 09/09/2021 - 12:00pm
Black holes were once thought not to have pressure, but a new set of quantum calculations has found that they may have some at their edges, which was completely unexpected
Categories: Astronomy

Blood test could reveal who is most likely to get severe covid-19

Thu, 09/09/2021 - 10:00am
A simple blood test could help predict which people with covid-19 are likely to get severely ill and need to go on a ventilator
Categories: Astronomy

Scorpions develop a sting in the tail before they are ready to use it

Thu, 09/09/2021 - 9:37am
Newborn scorpions produce and store venom in their tail, or telson, despite not being able to use it until they have shed their first exoskeleton
Categories: Astronomy

Covid-19 news: lab experiments help explain why the virus is so deadly

Thu, 09/09/2021 - 8:00am
The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic
Categories: Astronomy

Will China's algorithm crackdown serve its citizens or the state?

Thu, 09/09/2021 - 4:00am
China has drafted powerful new legislation that would control how businesses use data to target advertising, curate social media feeds and recommend content
Categories: Astronomy

mRNA cancer therapy now in human trials after shrinking mouse tumours

Wed, 09/08/2021 - 3:00pm
An mRNA cancer treatment developed by BioNTech and Sanofi is being tested in people after shrinking tumours in mice, and is hoped to repeat the success of mRNA covid-19 vaccines
Categories: Astronomy

Why cutting down on digging the garden can actually be good for soil

Wed, 09/08/2021 - 2:00pm
From novices to hard-core allotmenteers, all gardeners could benefit from the “no dig” method. New research suggests it may improve the soil, increase yields and reduce carbon emissions too.
Categories: Astronomy

A New World Order review: A powerful sci-fi movie without dialogue

Wed, 09/08/2021 - 2:00pm
A New World Order follows two people caught in a war against the machines. It has no dialogue and shows just how powerful silent films can be, says Simon Ings
Categories: Astronomy

Stephon Alexander interview: Is the universe a self-learning AI?

Wed, 09/08/2021 - 2:00pm
To solve the big mysteries in physics, we need to embrace fresh perspectives, says cosmologist Stephon Alexander. Here he explains why intuition is so important – and outlines one of his own wild ideas
Categories: Astronomy

Don't Miss: The Dinosaurs – New Visions of a Lost World

Wed, 09/08/2021 - 2:00pm
New Scientist's weekly round-up of the best books, films, TV series, games and more that you shouldn't miss
Categories: Astronomy

Animals at London zoo get their annual weigh-in

Wed, 09/08/2021 - 2:00pm
A few cunning tactics are needed to measure some of the animals at London Zoo, including strategically placing treats to entice squirrel monkeys to step onto some scales
Categories: Astronomy

In the Watchful City review: An impressive debut filled with folklore

Wed, 09/08/2021 - 2:00pm
A stranger and a cabinet of curiosities is enough to make a protector of a city rethink their position in S. Qiouyi Lu's novella In the Watchful City
Categories: Astronomy

The world is running out of microchips – here’s the solution

Wed, 09/08/2021 - 2:00pm
The chips at the heart of our digital devices are manufactured by a few large companies, but an open-source approach to design could end their dominance - with implications for everyone
Categories: Astronomy

No, there's nothing wrong with seedless fruits

Wed, 09/08/2021 - 2:00pm
There is an increasing number of people who think seedless fruits are bad for you, but actually the opposite is true, writes James Wong
Categories: Astronomy

When two grown men squared off over the size of their trajectories

Wed, 09/08/2021 - 2:00pm
Billionaires clash over their rockets, the amount of time food adds to or takes off your lifespan and horsing around with drugs all feature in Feedback’s weekly weird round-up
Categories: Astronomy