"Professor Goddard does not know the relation between action and reaction and the need to have something better than a vacuum against which to react. He seems to lack the basic knowledge ladled out daily in high schools."
--1921 New York Times editorial about Robert Goddard's revolutionary rocket work.

"Correction: It is now definitely established that a rocket can function in a vacuum. The 'Times' regrets the error."
NY Times, July 1969.

— New York Times

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Updated: 1 day 21 hours ago

End of covid-19 lockdown in England may be delayed, scientists say

Tue, 06/01/2021 - 7:52am
Experts have warned that the UK government may have to reconsider plans to lift restrictions on 21 June with infection numbers rising
Categories: Astronomy

Climate change to blame for 37 per cent of world’s heat-related deaths

Mon, 05/31/2021 - 12:00pm
Climate change caused 37 per cent of the heat-related deaths globally in the past three decades according to a new study – a reminder that global warming is already having severe impacts
Categories: Astronomy

Thrilling hints of elusive dark matter particles are starting to fade

Mon, 05/31/2021 - 6:00am
A detector in Italy has observed what seem to be hints of strange dark matter particles for more than 20 years – but a similar detector in Spain is throwing doubt on the results
Categories: Astronomy

Eye-tracking software could make video calls feel more lifelike

Mon, 05/31/2021 - 4:00am
It is hard to know where people are directing their attention during video calls, but eye-tracking software could help
Categories: Astronomy

The human genome has finally been completely sequenced after 20 years

Fri, 05/28/2021 - 4:04pm
Two decades after the first drafts of the human genome were published, new sequencing technologies mean it is finally complete – and could show us more than ever
Categories: Astronomy

Covid-19 news: More than 38% of new UK cases are due to Indian variant

Fri, 05/28/2021 - 2:30pm
The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic
Categories: Astronomy

5 charts that tell the story of how the coronavirus pandemic unfolded

Fri, 05/28/2021 - 1:53pm
Hannah Ritchie from Our World In Data picks her top five charts that show how the coronavirus pandemic has played out across the world
Categories: Astronomy

How courts and investors are forcing big oil companies to clean up

Fri, 05/28/2021 - 1:09pm
A landmark Dutch court ruling ordering oil company Shell to drastically cut carbon emissions, and investor votes at other oil firms to take environmental concerns more seriously, could be a turning point for the industry
Categories: Astronomy

Did covid-19 come from a lab or an animal? This is how we'll find out

Fri, 05/28/2021 - 12:47pm
The debate over covid-19's origins rumbles on. What is the evidence for and against a lab leak? And what evidence will finally prove it one way or another?
Categories: Astronomy

Hannah Ritchie interview: The woman giving covid-19 data to the world

Fri, 05/28/2021 - 11:55am
In the first of a new series of pandemic profiles, New Scientist talks to Hannah Ritchie, who reveals what it's like to provide presidents and the public with vital covid-19 data and what the trends suggest the virus has in store for us next
Categories: Astronomy

Johnson & Johnson one-shot coronavirus vaccine approved for use in UK

Fri, 05/28/2021 - 9:15am
The coronavirus vaccine developed by Johnson & Johnson’s pharmaceutical arm Janssen, which is a single-dose vaccine, has now been approved by the UK medicines regulator
Categories: Astronomy

Astronomers have created the largest ever map of dark matter

Fri, 05/28/2021 - 6:21am
Researchers have created the largest ever map of dark matter, the invisible material thought to account for 80 per cent of the total matter in the universe
Categories: Astronomy

Ancient jawbone reveals a 2500-kilometre journey from Sudan to Rome

Fri, 05/28/2021 - 6:00am
Analysis of a 1700-year-old jawbone found in a catacomb in Rome suggests it belonged to someone who grew up beyond southern margins of the Roman Empire, perhaps in what is now Sudan
Categories: Astronomy

Stepped platforms in Mesopotamia were the oldest known war memorial

Thu, 05/27/2021 - 8:01pm
More than 4300 years ago, people living in what is now Syria built an earthen monument filled with human remains, which were seemingly grouped into foot soldiers and charioteers. It was flooded in 1999 but now new details have emerged
Categories: Astronomy

Exoskeleton takes strain off legs to reduce energy needed for walking

Thu, 05/27/2021 - 3:00pm
An electrical generator built into a backpack attaches to a person’s heels to make walking more efficient while also harvesting enough energy to power itself
Categories: Astronomy

Covid-19 news: Possible cause of rare vaccine-linked blood clots found

Thu, 05/27/2021 - 1:28pm
The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic
Categories: Astronomy

Earliest known war was a repeated conflict in Sudan 13,400 years ago

Thu, 05/27/2021 - 12:00pm
Many of the hunter-gatherer-fishers buried at a 13,400-year-old cemetery in Sudan show signs of battle injuries – and a new analysis suggests the fighting occurred on several occasions
Categories: Astronomy

The first complex cell may have had dozens of nuclei instead of one

Thu, 05/27/2021 - 6:00am
The original complex cells may have been less like amoebas and more like the cells of fungi that contain many nuclei, each with a copy of the genome
Categories: Astronomy

Drones may have attacked humans fully autonomously for the first time

Thu, 05/27/2021 - 5:52am
Military drones may have autonomously attacked humans for the first time ever during a conflict in Libya last year, according to a United Nations report
Categories: Astronomy

Laser pulses travel faster than light without breaking laws of physics

Thu, 05/27/2021 - 5:00am
Pulses of laser light moving through a jet of plasma can surf a wave to travel faster or slower than the speed of light without breaking the laws of physics
Categories: Astronomy