"The large-scale homogeneity of the universe makes it very difficult to believe that the structure of the universe is determined by anything so peripheral as some complicated molecular structure on a minor planet orbiting a very average star in the outer suburbs of a fairly typical galaxy."

— Steven Hawking

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Updated: 15 hours 17 min ago

The ozone hole over the South Pole is now bigger than Antarctica

Wed, 09/15/2021 - 3:00pm
Each year between August and October, the ozone over the South Pole is depleted – this year the hole is larger than 75 per cent of the holes that had formed by this point in the season since 1979
Categories: Astronomy

Cheap covid-19 antibody test shows if you have immunity in 5 minutes

Wed, 09/15/2021 - 3:00pm
A cheap and accurate test that can tell if people have covid-19 antibodies could be used to monitor population immunity from past infections as well as vaccines
Categories: Astronomy

Help create a global map of light pollution by gazing at the night sky

Wed, 09/15/2021 - 2:00pm
Scientists are tracking light pollution and its effects globally by gazing at the night sky – and now the Globe at Night project needs your help
Categories: Astronomy

Karmalink review: An intriguing mix of Buddhism and nanotech

Wed, 09/15/2021 - 2:00pm
A young boy uses nanotechnology to decipher the clues in his dreams in Karmalink, an original sci-fi drama set in a near-future version of Cambodia
Categories: Astronomy

We’ve mastered acoustic levitation – and it is surprisingly useful

Wed, 09/15/2021 - 2:00pm
Sonic tractor beams lift and manipulate objects with sound waves. They could be used to precisely deliver drugs inside our bodies or assemble delicate computer chips in mid air
Categories: Astronomy

Don't miss: The Climate Coup looks at the finance of climate change

Wed, 09/15/2021 - 2:00pm
New Scientist's weekly round-up of the best books, films, TV series, games and more that you shouldn’t miss
Categories: Astronomy

Index, a history of the: Exploring the rivalries in how we search

Wed, 09/15/2021 - 2:00pm
Index, A history of the by Dennis Duncan will take you from 13th-century cloisters to Silicon Valley in its exploration of how we search for information
Categories: Astronomy

The microbial gunk that hardens on teeth is revealing our deep past

Wed, 09/15/2021 - 2:00pm
Plaque fossilises while we are still alive. Now, dental calculus is giving up the secrets of our ancient ancestors, from what they ate to how they interacted and evolved
Categories: Astronomy

Scientists are often cautious or wrong – and that’s OK

Wed, 09/15/2021 - 2:00pm
We like to think that science can give us definitive answers to our questions, but uncertainty is a crucial part of the scientific process, says Chanda Prescod-Weinstein
Categories: Astronomy

The pick of the strange science that won Ig Nobel prizes this year

Wed, 09/15/2021 - 2:00pm
Chewing gum forensics, sex as a decongestant and attempts to find the smell of fear all scooped accolades at the 2021 Ig Nobel award ceremony, with Feedback watching on
Categories: Astronomy

Why are orcas ‘attacking’ fishing boats off the coast of Gibraltar?

Wed, 09/15/2021 - 2:00pm
Orcas, also known as killer whales, have been involved in a number of recent incidents with boats around Gibraltar, leaving researchers, sailors and local authorities scrambling to understand why
Categories: Astronomy

We should isolate when we have flu, not just covid-19

Wed, 09/15/2021 - 2:00pm
The new social norm of isolating when ill with covid-19 should apply to other infectious diseases such as flu, says Jonathan Goodman
Categories: Astronomy

Is the delta coronavirus variant more dangerous for children?

Wed, 09/15/2021 - 2:00pm
Reports from some US hospitals have suggested that the delta coronavirus variant is more likely to have severe symptoms in children and hospitalise them, but the evidence for this is limited
Categories: Astronomy

The Story of Looking review: A new film examines the visual world

Wed, 09/15/2021 - 2:00pm
Mark Cousins takes a personal look at how what we see shapes us. It may just make you reconsider how you view things
Categories: Astronomy

Astronomers may have found a moon orbiting a rogue planet with no star

Wed, 09/15/2021 - 1:36pm
Exomoons are notoriously hard to spot, but it may be easier around free-floating planets that don't orbit stars – and a team of astronomers may have already found one
Categories: Astronomy

Call for English households with bulging waste bins to pay extra

Wed, 09/15/2021 - 12:56pm
Stalled recycling rates in England could be lifted through a bin tax, giving people a financial incentive to send less waste to landfill and reducing collections of waste, says an expert group appointed by the UK government
Categories: Astronomy

Global demand for fish expected to almost double by 2050

Wed, 09/15/2021 - 12:00pm
Brazil, Ghana, India and Nigeria are all predicted to more than double the weight of fish they consume by 2050, with aquaculture feeding demand
Categories: Astronomy

Most CO2 from Australia’s megafires has been offset by algal blooms

Wed, 09/15/2021 - 12:00pm
About 80 per cent of the carbon dioxide released by Australia’s huge wildfires of 2019-2020 was captured by ocean algal blooms that grew due to the iron-rich ash
Categories: Astronomy

Generation Covid: What the pandemic means for young people’s futures

Wed, 09/15/2021 - 11:50am
The long-term impact of the pandemic will be felt most by those growing up in its grasp. Generational analysis can tell us what we should expect, from education and income to mental health and the response to climate change
Categories: Astronomy

Younger generations are the most fatalistic about climate change

Wed, 09/15/2021 - 6:54am
Older generations are wrongly accused of caring less about the climate than younger people, according to a new survey. Just one in five Baby Boomers say there is no point in changing their behaviour to tackle climate change, compared with a third of Generation Z
Categories: Astronomy