"Professor Goddard does not know the relation between action and reaction and the need to have something better than a vacuum against which to react. He seems to lack the basic knowledge ladled out daily in high schools."
--1921 New York Times editorial about Robert Goddard's revolutionary rocket work.

"Correction: It is now definitely established that a rocket can function in a vacuum. The 'Times' regrets the error."
NY Times, July 1969.

— New York Times

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Updated: 26 min 50 sec ago

Implantable device blocks pain by chilling nerves inside the body

Thu, 06/30/2022 - 3:00pm
An implant made from biodegradable materials chills nerves to 10°C, reducing pain signals sent to rats' brains, and can be absorbed into the body over time
Categories: Astronomy

Why two-thirds of IVF embryos suddenly stop developing

Thu, 06/30/2022 - 3:00pm
A new insight into why some IVF embryos go into "developmental arrest" could help researchers create treatments that coax them into growing normally
Categories: Astronomy

What does the new US Supreme Court ruling mean for carbon emissions?

Thu, 06/30/2022 - 1:53pm
In a major environmental case, the US Supreme Court has ruled to limit the Environmental Protection Agency's ability to regulate greenhouse gas emissions. Here's what you need to know
Categories: Astronomy

Zika or dengue infections make you more appealing to mosquitoes

Thu, 06/30/2022 - 12:00pm
Infection with Zika or dengue viruses affects the microbiome of the skin, ramping up production of compounds that entice mosquitoes. But treatment with a common acne medication may cancel out this effect
Categories: Astronomy

AI predicts crime a week in advance with 90 per cent accuracy

Thu, 06/30/2022 - 12:00pm
An artificial intelligence that scours crime data can predict the location of crimes in the coming week with up to 90 per cent accuracy, but there are concerns how systems like this can perpetuate bias
Categories: Astronomy

Spinal cord stimulation enables paralysed monkeys to move their arms

Thu, 06/30/2022 - 12:00pm
An electrode implanted in the necks of three monkeys with partial arm paralysis stimulated nerves in the spinal cord and amplified the signals of nerve cells that had survived paralysis
Categories: Astronomy

UK mushroom growing uses 100,000 m³ of peat a year – can we do better?

Thu, 06/30/2022 - 8:00am
Peat bogs are an important carbon store, so mushroom growers are searching for a way to grow their produce on other substrates
Categories: Astronomy

Self-charging buoy could harness wave power to monitor the oceans

Thu, 06/30/2022 - 6:40am
A buoy powered by the movement of waves could be used to sense water levels for early flood warning systems or to check long-term water quality
Categories: Astronomy

Life expectancy of Native American peoples falls 4.7 years since 2019

Thu, 06/30/2022 - 5:24am
Amid the pandemic, the life expectancy of American Indian or Alaska Native people is thought to have fallen by nearly five years from 2019 to 2021, the biggest decline of any ethnic group in the US
Categories: Astronomy

Carbon monoxide foam in the rectum eases bowel disease in mice

Wed, 06/29/2022 - 5:02pm
It's best known as a deadly poison, but in low doses, carbon monoxide can have therapeutic benefits for conditions like inflammatory bowel disease and cancer. Now, researchers may have found a way to deliver the treatment safely in a foam
Categories: Astronomy

The headline tricks that make people share news stories on Facebook!?!

Wed, 06/29/2022 - 3:00pm
Unusual punctuation in headlines makes people more likely to share news stories on Facebook, but phrases like “this will blow your mind” are a turn-off, finds a study
Categories: Astronomy

Ghost DNA from hybrid coyotes could save endangered red wolves

Wed, 06/29/2022 - 3:00pm
A hidden reservoir of red wolf DNA has been found in coyotes in southwestern Louisiana – and it could be used to help the endangered wolves grow their wild population
Categories: Astronomy

How Minds Change review: The science of persuasion in a divided world

Wed, 06/29/2022 - 2:00pm
David McRaney's argument that it is possible to find common ground with those holding diametrically opposing views is a tonic, finds Chris Stokel-Walker
Categories: Astronomy

We should celebrate the diversity and knowledge of farmers' markets

Wed, 06/29/2022 - 2:00pm
Farmers' markets sell more diverse fruit and veg than big stores. They are also a repository of knowledge, and serve as plant conservation hubs, says Beronda L. Montgomery
Categories: Astronomy

Put down the coffee: Study finds caffeine drives impulse purchases

Wed, 06/29/2022 - 2:00pm
Feedback learns to avoid drinking a cup of coffee before hitting the shops, while also pondering the benefits of a remote-control hot tub, and continuing the hunt for a new word for anti-expert
Categories: Astronomy

Advising alcohol abstinence in pregnancy may do more harm than good

Wed, 06/29/2022 - 2:00pm
New guidelines from the World Health Organization recommending abstinence from alcohol in pregnancy could have wide ramifications, warns Jules Montague
Categories: Astronomy

Dogs are descended from two populations of ancient wolves

Wed, 06/29/2022 - 1:31pm
Modern dogs have ancestry from wolves in Asia and Europe, according to a study analysing DNA from 72 ancient wolves going back 100,000 years
Categories: Astronomy

Hawks forward dive and then swoop up to hit the brakes before landing

Wed, 06/29/2022 - 12:00pm
A diving manoeuvre used by raptors to slow down before landing on a branch could improve technology for flying and perching drones
Categories: Astronomy

We may have misunderstood how norovirus and other gut viruses spread

Wed, 06/29/2022 - 12:00pm
Norovirus lives in the gut – but mouse studies suggest it may also survive in salivary glands, and the discovery implies there are additional measures we could take to limit infections
Categories: Astronomy

Can we beat climate change by geoengineering the oceans?

Wed, 06/29/2022 - 11:00am
Chemically altering the seas through iron fertilisation or alkalinity enhancement could be our best hope to suck vast amounts of carbon out of the atmosphere – but questions remain on whether it is worth the risk
Categories: Astronomy