"The large-scale homogeneity of the universe makes it very difficult to believe that the structure of the universe is determined by anything so peripheral as some complicated molecular structure on a minor planet orbiting a very average star in the outer suburbs of a fairly typical galaxy."

— Steven Hawking

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Updated: 4 hours 33 min ago

Supercomputer simulates 77,000 neurons in the brain in real-time

Tue, 10/08/2019 - 5:00am
A brain-inspired computer can simulate part of the sensory cortex in real time, using tens of thousands of virtual neurons. It is the first time such a complex simulation has run this fast
Categories: Astronomy

UK scientists join the Extinction Rebellion climate change protests

Mon, 10/07/2019 - 12:49pm
New Scientist spoke to members of Extinction Rebellion who are scientists to find out why they are taking to the streets of London to protest climate change inaction
Categories: Astronomy

The key to a long life may be genes that protect against stress

Mon, 10/07/2019 - 9:22am
Long-lived animals like the grey whale and naked mole rat have genes that protect them from stress and cancer
Categories: Astronomy

Microbial life might drift in the atmospheres of failed stars

Mon, 10/07/2019 - 6:32am
Brown dwarfs are too large to be planets and too small to be stars, but they have gaseous atmospheres that may have all the ingredients needed for life
Categories: Astronomy

Nobel prize in physics for discovery of exoplanet orbiting a star

Mon, 10/07/2019 - 5:40am
The Nobel prize in physics has been jointly awarded to  James Peebles, Michel Mayor and Didier Queloz for their contributions to our understanding of the evolution of the universe and Earth’s place in the cosmos.
Categories: Astronomy

Nobel prize for medicine goes to discovery of how cells sense oxygen

Mon, 10/07/2019 - 5:40am
The Nobel prize in physiology or medicine has been jointly awarded to William Kaelin of Harvard University, Peter Ratcliffe of Oxford University and Gregg Semenza of Johns Hopkins University, for their discovery of how cells sense and adapt to oxygen availability
Categories: Astronomy

New Scientist Live: How massive sewer-clogging fatbergs are made

Mon, 10/07/2019 - 3:00am
Rafaella Villa will explain at New Scientist Live this month how fat, oil and grease can become huge underground fatbergs
Categories: Astronomy

We can send a probe to interstellar comet Borisov – but not until 2030

Sun, 10/06/2019 - 6:00am
Astronomers are racing to learn about only the second interstellar object ever seen. We now know it contains cyanide gas – and we could send a probe to visit it
Categories: Astronomy

Oldest ever illustrated book is a guide to Ancient Egyptian underworld

Sat, 10/05/2019 - 2:00am
The Book of Two Ways is a 4000-year-old illustrated guide to the Ancient Egyptian underworld, and fragments of the earliest known copy have now been found
Categories: Astronomy

Anti-evolution drug may help treat resistant breast cancers

Fri, 10/04/2019 - 7:01pm
Some breast tumours evolve resistance to chemotherapy, but a new drug already in human trials could restore the effectiveness of the main existing treatment
Categories: Astronomy

Home aquarium hobbyists are helping save 30 rare fish from extinction

Fri, 10/04/2019 - 6:33am
The pet trade often harms wildlife but some dedicated amateur fish-keepers are working to keep many species of fish from extinction
Categories: Astronomy

Weird repeating signals from deep space may be created by starquakes

Fri, 10/04/2019 - 6:26am
Fast radio bursts are mysterious signals from space. Some of them repeat many times - and these may be caused by powerful starquakes
Categories: Astronomy

The hunt for dark matter is heating up at New Scientist Live

Fri, 10/04/2019 - 4:00am
The hunt for dark matter is heating up. At New Scientist Live next week, astrophysicist Chamkaur Ghag will explain how to look for this elusive stuff
Categories: Astronomy

A mind-controlled exoskeleton helped a man with paralysis walk again

Thu, 10/03/2019 - 6:30pm
A man who has paralysis has managed to walk again using an exoskeleton he controls with his mind. The suit is directed by electrodes that rest on the brain's surface, but it can't yet allow independent walking  
Categories: Astronomy

Humans may be trading far more species of wildlife than we thought

Thu, 10/03/2019 - 2:00pm
Estimates based on two wildlife databases suggest 5000 species are traded around the world, with larger, more distinctive animals most at risk
Categories: Astronomy

We've had our best glimpse of a web of matter that spans the universe

Thu, 10/03/2019 - 2:00pm
A vast spider web of matter is thought to stretch across the universe. Now astronomers have seen its filaments between several galaxies for the first time
Categories: Astronomy

Thousands of UK wildlife and plant species are in decline

Thu, 10/03/2019 - 2:00pm
The most comprehensive assessment yet of the state of nature in the UK has found the area occupied by more than 6500 species has shrunk by 5 per cent since 1970
Categories: Astronomy

Implanting false memories in a bird's brain changes its tune

Thu, 10/03/2019 - 2:00pm
Young zebra finches that have never heard adults sing learned to produce notes of different lengths because of false memories researchers implanted in their brains
Categories: Astronomy

Giant boom traps plastic waste from the oceans for the first time

Thu, 10/03/2019 - 12:23pm
Boyan Slat of The Ocean Cleanup says that after a failure last year, his giant v-shaped boom system is now collecting plastic from the Great Pacific Garbage Patch
Categories: Astronomy

Common sense can predict if a psychology study will ever be replicated

Thu, 10/03/2019 - 11:55am
Many classic social science and psychology findings haven’t stood up to further testing. Now a study suggests people can guess whether research will hold up
Categories: Astronomy