Who are we? We find that we live on an insignificant planet of a humdrum star lost in a galaxy tucked away in some forgotten corner of a universe in which there are far more galaxies than people

— Carl Sagan

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Updated: 22 hours 45 min ago

Interview: The women behind the Oxford/AstraZeneca covid-19 vaccine

Sat, 07/03/2021 - 8:00pm
The Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine has saved 27,000 deaths in England since the beginning of the year. Clare Wilson speaks to some of its creators - Sarah Gilbert, Catherine Green and Theresa Lambe - about the rollercoaster of events that led to this historic achievement
Categories: Astronomy

Covid-19 news: UK shares vaccine data to help EU approve travellers

Fri, 07/02/2021 - 1:42pm
The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic
Categories: Astronomy

Streamlined JPEG XL images could cut global data use by 30 per cent

Fri, 07/02/2021 - 1:03pm
An updated version of the ubiquitous JPEG image format used across the internet could bring global bandwidth savings of 30 per cent, say the creators of JPEG XL, who have made the technology royalty-free
Categories: Astronomy

Are we seeing an end to 'surveillance capitalism' on the internet?

Fri, 07/02/2021 - 11:26am
Some of the world's largest technology companies are starting to offer a new type of privacy on their platforms. It will appease some customers' concerns around online advertising, but shouldn't be to the detriment of the companies
Categories: Astronomy

Solar sail spacecraft could be used to intercept interstellar objects

Fri, 07/02/2021 - 10:39am
We rarely get more than a fleeting look at interstellar objects that enter our solar system, but a new spacecraft design could be quick enough to intercept them before they leave
Categories: Astronomy

Fish covered in tooth-like armour could help reveal how teeth evolved

Fri, 07/02/2021 - 4:00am
A pet fish adorned with tooth-like scales is helping biologists tackle a longstanding debate about the origin of teeth
Categories: Astronomy

Common plastics can be broken down by enzymes found in cow stomachs

Fri, 07/02/2021 - 1:15am
The bacteria in a cow's stomach produce enzymes that can break down the plastic used to make bottles and bags, and could one day be used to process such plastics after use
Categories: Astronomy

How can we adapt to the intense heat and drought in the western US?

Thu, 07/01/2021 - 3:43pm
An unusual weather pattern called a heat dome has baked the US west, but this anomaly could become more normal as the climate warms – how can we adapt in the next few years?
Categories: Astronomy

Covid-19 news: Booster vaccines in England planned for September

Thu, 07/01/2021 - 1:55pm
The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic
Categories: Astronomy

Iceland may be part of a submerged continent called Icelandia

Thu, 07/01/2021 - 11:08am
There may be a hidden continent under the North Atlantic, of which Iceland is the only part that extends above water – a relic of a time when Earth’s continents were joined into one
Categories: Astronomy

Strange new fairy lantern plant is already critically endangered

Thu, 07/01/2021 - 8:59am
This bizarre-shaped plant from a Malaysian rainforest appears to be so vanishingly rare it should already be considered critically endangered
Categories: Astronomy

Aquatic beetle caught walking upside down on the undersurface of water

Thu, 07/01/2021 - 6:00am
An Australian aquatic beetle has been seen walking upside down on the underside of the water’s surface – a style of locomotion never been recorded before in an animal with legs
Categories: Astronomy

Mini-heart grown in the lab can pump fluid just like the real thing

Thu, 07/01/2021 - 4:00am
A tiny version of an embryonic heart made using human stem cells can pump fluid around channels on a laboratory slide, and will help researchers study congenital heart defects
Categories: Astronomy

New fossil finds show we are far from understanding how humans evolved

Wed, 06/30/2021 - 2:00pm
We should be wary of attempts to impose a simple narrative on the story of early human evolution – recent discoveries can be interpreted in many ways and future finds are likely to cause further rethinking
Categories: Astronomy

How to make the world’s best barbecue this summer

Wed, 06/30/2021 - 2:00pm
Planning a spot of outdoor grilling? From charcoal briquette to gas, the best place to start is to understand your fuel and how to get the most out of it, says Sam Wong
Categories: Astronomy

A Psalm for the Wild-Built by Becky Chambers is joyful sci-fi reading

Wed, 06/30/2021 - 2:00pm
Becky Chambers, the award-winning author of the Wayfarers series, builds a different world in A Psalm for the Wild-Built. But it shares the same warm optimism, finds Jacob Aron
Categories: Astronomy

Engineered immunity: Redesigning antibodies to better fight disease

Wed, 06/30/2021 - 2:00pm
Antibodies are a vital weapon in our immune system's arsenal. Now we can redesign them like never before to boost our ability to fight cancer and viruses like HIV, says immunologist Daniel M. Davis
Categories: Astronomy

Don't Miss: Biohackers returns to Netflix for season 2

Wed, 06/30/2021 - 2:00pm
New Scientist's weekly round-up of the best books, films, TV series, games and more that you shouldn't miss
Categories: Astronomy

Amazing surfing sharks image shows how currents help them save energy

Wed, 06/30/2021 - 2:00pm
Grey reef sharks seem to be just hanging in the water in this photograph by Laurent Ballesta. In reality, they are surfing upward currents, cutting their energy consumption by about 15 per cent
Categories: Astronomy

Bakelite made the 20th century, but the plastic's legacy is sobering

Wed, 06/30/2021 - 2:00pm
Bakelite was a breakthrough material when it was invented in 1907: industry loved it, and the public admired the stylish radios it made. But as a new documentary hints, it came at a cost
Categories: Astronomy